Out & About

Within an hour of travelling time from Redesdale, you will find numerous venues to visit including castles, country houses, beautiful beaches and many more places of interest

Castles & Country Houses

Northumberland is peppered with hundreds of historic castles and country houses that are a great reflection of what life was like in the region in olden times. Perfect for history enthusiasts, the majesty and stunning views of these well-preserved structures make for an interesting stop for those that want to get a glimpse of the past

Warkworth Castle 

One of Northumberland’s strongest, largest, and most impressive fortresses, it crowns a hilltop above the River Coquet with its remarkable cross-shaped keep. Owned by the Percy family who used to wield such great power and influence in the North, the castle’s towered walls circuit is still very much intact and is the setting of the extensive remains of a chapel, fine gatehouse, and a great hall. If you are up to a little adventure, hop on a boat and visit the cave Hermitage and chapel located just half a mile from the castle. 

Alnwick Castle

Quite famous for its appearance in the Harry Potter films and Downton Abbey, Alnwick Castle is a country house and castle rolled into one. A massive tourist attraction, it comprises of sweeping grounds and historical buildings although access may be limited to certain areas due to its historic nature. A great destination for families, visitors will enjoy the free daily talks and tours around the castle which delves into its remarkable family history along with its rather tumultuous past. Kids will especially love the numerous entertainments the castle provides from courageous knights and fire-eating jesters to medieval artisans and master falconers. Visitors can even don some medieval finery and take part in medieval games, swordplay, and traditional crafts at the castle’s Artisan’s Courtyard arena. 

Bamburgh Castle 

Quite famous for its appearance in the Harry Potter films and Downton Abbey, Alnwick Castle is a country house and castle rolled into one. A massive tourist attraction, it comprises of sweeping grounds and historical buildings although access may be limited to certain areas due to its historic nature. A great destination for families, visitors will enjoy the free daily talks and tours around the castle which delves into its remarkable family history along with its rather tumultuous past. Kids will especially love the numerous entertainments the castle provides from courageous knights and fire-eating jesters to medieval artisans and master falconers. Visitors can even don some medieval finery and take part in medieval games, swordplay, and traditional crafts at the castle’s Artisan’s Courtyard arena. 

Warkworth Castle 

A 17th Century mansion built for Sir William Blackett, Lord Mayor of Newcastle in 1718, it was eventually owned by the Trevelyan family. This magnificent estate is not only a much-loved home to the Trevelyans, but it has also been the setting of both play and politics in its heyday. Visitors will love the wide selection of activities they can do when dropping by from exploring its rich history and admiring its magnificent walled garden, enjoying a walk at the grassy courtyard and picking out a souvenir in one of its shops to indulging in a tasty hot meal at the Clocktower Café. It doesn’t matter the season, there is always something interesting and fun to do at Wallington Hall.

Belsay Hall 

This country house will never fail to impress with its Grecian architecture, acres of exquisite gardens and medieval castles. There is so much to see and do from its magnificent Jacobean mansion, the stunning top of the tower views, the architectural masterpiece of the Pillar Hall, and the impressive grounds bedecked with captivating shrubs and flowers. You’ll also love how you can just end the day with a much-deserved meal at the tearoom which is set in the house’s original kitchen. 

Cragside

This Victorian house is set in 900 acres of land was built by the industrialist Lord Armstrong. Considered as the modern magician’s palace back in 1880, it was the first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity. A walk around the property will reveal some truly ingenious gadgetry from a passenger lift, Turkish bath suite, telephones, and even fire alarm buttons. The grounds of the estate offer numerous activities that will keep the family busy with over 30 miles of lakeside walks and footpaths. The estate is also the setting of one of the largest rock gardens in Europe. Kids will love the labyrinth, tall trees, adventure play area, and tumbling streams surrounding the magnificent estate.

scottish border towns

Perfectly positioned as the easiest to reach parts of Scotland, be prepared to be met by open countryside, rolling hills, picturesque coastlines, and gentle valleys. Visit the old mill towns on the border—Hawick, Jedburgh and Kelso— where you will find numerous bargains in tweed fabrics and much more. There is a host of activities you can do when you visit these border towns too. From scenic walks to explore the beautiful countryside, golfing, cycling, and fishing, there is no shortage of things to do.

HERITAGE COAST

Beautiful beaches and coastal villages at Craster, Warkworth, Alnmouth and many more await you in one of England’s long stretches of coastlines. The long stretch of sandy beaches and the general absence of a crowd make these coastlines a must-visit for those dying to escape the city buzz. Worthy of note is Warkworth with its sand dunes, Cocklawburn with its ancient fossil beds, Low Newton for its rare marine species, and Bamburgh for its striking dunes. 

kielder water

This man-made reservoir offers some exciting experience for the nature lovers– offering such activities as sailing, a cruise around the reservoir, fishing, walking, cycling, swimming and many more. All this set in the vast Kielder forest where lakeside & forest trails offer visitors many pleasant surprises – see also some of nature’s legendary predators at the Birds of Prey Centre and enjoy looking up at the beautiful English sky at the Kielder Observatory.

roman sites

 There are many sites of historic interest – The Roman or Hadrian’s Wall built some 2000 years ago marked the northern extent of the Roman Empire stretching from Wallsend in the East to Carlisle in the West. Along the wall are forts and sites such as the Hugh site at Corbridge, the fort and civilian settlement at Vindolanda, Roman cavalry fort at Chesters and high on a ridge Housesteads which offers exhilarating views of open moorland. 

newcastle

 With Chinatown, theatreland and lots of shopping facilities, Newcastle offers everything you can ask for from shopping to dining. A short trip over the Tyne to Gateshead will bring you to Europe’s largest indoor shopping centre the Metro Centre a state of the art shopping centre with a children’s playland at Metroland. 

A foodie heaven, you’ll love all the great restaurants crammed in the city to offer you a wide variety of culinary options based on your budget and taste. If going out is more your thing, Newcastle has one of the country’s top-notch nightlife. It is abuzz with culture too from art galleries to world-class concert halls. Whether you are just visiting for the weekend or thinking of actually settling in for good, Newcastle will never disappoint.